a deep habit

Like many of Tesla’s inventions, the Tesla coil exploits the principle of resonance which has become such a common trope in contemporary thought as to warrant a brief description here. Not so much a law of nature as a deep habit, resonance pops up across the board, emerging in electrical systems, steam engines, and molecular dynamics, as well as Tuvan overtone chanting and the tuning of TV sets. Everything vibrates, and when the oscillating vibrations of different systems coincide, or resonate, large quantities of energy can be exchanged from one system to the other.

Davis, Erik. TechGnosis: Myth, Magic, and Mysticism in the Age of Information. New York: Harmony Books, 2004. 86-7.

the implicate order

The mathematics itself suggest a movement in which everything, in which any particular element of space may have a field which unfolds into the whole and the whole enfolds into it. So you have this movement, and I call this the implicate or enfolded order which unfolds into the explicate order where everything is separate. now the implicate order, everything is internally related to everything. Everything contains everything.

Bohm, David. Wijers, Louwrien. Art Meets Science and Spirituality in a Changing Economy – Pt. 1 – From Fragmentation to Wholeness, 1999. (film of panel discussion. “This film, part one of the series, features the Dalai Lama speaking on the nature of mind and on his personal feelings as leader of the Tibetans in exile, the physicist David Bohm, who explains his theory of the “implicate order”; and interviews with artist Robert Rauschenberg and Russian economist Stanislav Menshikov.”)

Graphite

Graphite is an example of a crystal that crystallizes in the hexagonal crystal system.

< http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexagonal_crystal_system >

the science of imginary solutions

It will study the laws which govern exceptions and will explain the universe supplementary to this one; or, less ambitiously, it will describe a universe which one can see—must see perhaps—instead of the traditional one, for the laws discovered in the traditional universe are themselves correlated exceptions, even though frequent, or in any case accidental facts which, reduced to scarcely exceptional exceptions, don’t even have the advantage of singularity.

Definition: ‘Pataphysics is the science of imaginary solutions, which symbolically attributes the properties of objects, described by their virtuality, to their lineaents.

Shattuck, Roger. The Banquet Years. New York: Vintage Books, 1968. 241-242.

the triumphant achievements of science

The impulse behind my insistent concern with the triumphant achievements of science is most elemental: I believe simply that an analysis of any of man’s achievements may reveal basic principles of methodology which, properly adjusted to the immediate conditions of other problems, may lead to similar triumphs. My argument is that if such a procedure is to have any value, then it must be based on a thorough observation of the whole method, and not a tangential development of some portion of it.

Maya Deren, “An Anagram of Ideas on Art, Form and Film”
Reprinted in Nichols, Bill, ed. Maya Deren and the American Avant-Garde. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 2001

music of the sun

Astronomers at the University of Sheffield have managed to record for the first time the eerie musical harmonies produced by the magnetic field in the outer atmosphere of the sun.

They found that huge magnetic loops that have been observed coiling away from the outer layer of the sun’s atmosphere, known as coronal loops, vibrate like strings on a musical instrument.

In other cases they behave more like soundwaves as they travel through a wind instrument.

Gray, Richard. “Music of the sun recorded by scientists.” Telegraph.co.uk 19 June 2010.

Event Horizon

“In general relativity, an event horizon is a boundary in spacetime, most often an area surrounding a black hole, beyond which events cannot affect an outside observer. Light emitted from beyond the horizon can never reach the observer, and any object that approaches the horizon from the observer’s side appears to slow down and never quite pass through the horizon, with its image becoming more and more redshifted as time elapses. The traveling object, however, experiences no strange effects and does, in fact, pass through the horizon in a finite amount of proper time. “